Atlas MD Podcast 21 – Inside the Mind of Medical Students

Atlas MD Podcast 21 – Inside the Mind of Medical Students

In the latest podcast, Drs. Josh and Doug talk about their upcoming travel schedule, which recent updates to the Atlas.md EMR have made the most impact on clinic efficiency, the launch of IAmDirectCare.com, and how a $600 prescription turned into $6 (that’s not a typo!).

Next, the docs open up the floor to two medical students from Kansas City who have been shadowing Atlas MD for the past month. The students verbally explore their chosen paths, and express how Direct Primary Care fits into their future plans. Then they grill Josh and Doug on a handful of questions everyone’s thinking, but may not be asking out loud. They discuss marketing practices, how DPC sells itself, why it’s best not to offer insurance out of the gate when starting your DPC practice, and how in the world some docs still don’t see the benefit of the DPC model. The students don’t hold back and succeed in getting their answers.

Through it all, it’s becoming more clear that the DPC message is reaching more physician hopefuls throughout more aspects of their training. Although it can sound too good to be true, docs are learning that the DPC model can solve a lot of problems for a lot of people if implemented in the right way.

Listen to Podcast 21 here for all the details! > 

Breitbart Builds Massive Dialogue After Reporting on Dr. Doug’s CNN Money Feature

Breitbart Builds Massive Dialogue After Reporting on Dr. Doug’s CNN Money Feature

We told you about Dr. Doug’s CNN Money feature last week. Now, in a recent articleBreitbart quotes that “after five years of dealing with the red tape of health insurance companies and the high overhead for the staff [Dr. Doug] hired just to deal with paperwork, he switched to a system of charging his patients a monthly fee plus the price of an office visit or test.” We did want to point out that this line had a bit of an error. Dr. Doug charges extra for things like MRIs, prescriptions, blood panels, but NOT for office visits. But, regardless of the minor oversight, the article generated a massive conversation, with resounding support for concierge medicine.

Read more