Posted by: Atlas MD

November 8, 2018

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What’s New in Atlas? Improvements to Enrollment, Exports and More

We’re happy to announce a whole raft of new features and improvements we’ve released this fall.

Enrollment Improvements

Patient Quick Add for Companies
We’ve added the ability for you to use the short form to quickly onboard patients that are part of a company payment plan. So when you land that new big corporate group, you can get them into Atlas just that much quicker.

Notification Email Improvements
We’ve redesigned the notification emails for new patient enrollment to include even more of the useful details you might want to know at a glance.

Sidebar Improvements

Preferred Pharmacy NumberMortar and pestle with doctor symbol
Unfortunately one of the things many doctors have to do frequently is call the pharmacy for a patient. “Missing” faxes, refills, inventory, etc. No more having to dig. Your patient’s preferred pharmacy number is now right there in the sidebar when you view their chart.

Redesigned Medical History
Patient health history is even easier to review at a glance with the newly designed format in the sidebar.

Consistent Persistent Sidebar
Now Atlas remembers how you prefer to have your sidebar as you navigate the app. Open or closed, you get to have it how you like when you like.

Export Improvements

Excel Friendly Dates in .csv Exports
We’ve improved the formatting for data in .csv exports. Now the dates are automatically recognized by Excel without any fiddling.

Billing History Export to .csv
From the detailed billing history page of a patient or a company, you can now export the data in an Excel friendly format. This is a great way to share with parties who you don’t want to have direct access to Atlas.

Company Balance Export
If you need a list of companies who owe you money, you can now get a list and a total from the Company Billing page.

Dispense History Export Improvements
We’ve improved many things about the dispense history export. Manufacturer name, branch location, and patient contact data are some of the highlights. If you ever need a list of patients who are on a certain drug, you’re one click away from having a list of phone numbers and names.

Download and Print Options for Subscription Invoices
Now you can print or download all of your subscription invoices from Atlas. Easier to share. Easier to archive.

Improved Patient Export
Now you can see upcoming appointments and the primary doctor in the patient export.

Shipping History Export
Now you can export a subset of your shipping history. Filter by branch, or date range to get exactly the data you’re looking for.

Other Improvements

Disable Drag & Drop in the Calendar
Though being able to easily rearrange your calendar was one of our core design goals, not all users like things so fluid for every account. An accidentally dragged date can lead to a missed appointment, and an upset patient. Now you can disable the feature across your entire account.

Macros on Email Drug Labels
Now the macros you know and love throughout Atlas also work on the Email Drug Labels. Streamlining your workflow and messaging to your patients even more.

Wrapping Up

We hope you love all of the improvements to Atlas.md we’ve launched this month. If you have questions or comments, please send them over to support@atlas.md for a speedy response, or drop by our Facebook group to chat about things https://www.facebook.com/groups/atlasmd/

Posted by: Atlas MD

September 4, 2018

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What’s New in Atlas? Billing and Enrollment Improvements

In our ongoing efforts to let you run your clinic in the way that makes the most sense for you, we’ve launched a couple new small but large features. A checkbox here, or a radio button there can mean the difference between Atlas.md being a perfect fit, and not fitting at all for some clinics.

For the rest of us, the flexibility these features add will let us know that Atlas will continue to fit perfectly no matter how your clinic grows in the future.

Handling Fee for Prescriptions

You’ve always been able to control the prices for the medications you dispense in Atlas. But a feature that is often requested in support is to add a handling fee to the prescription. Our suggestion at support has always been to divide your handling fees across your inventory and just raise prices a bit.

That amounted to more work for some clinics, and Atlas is definitely not about making you do more work… Or math. Now you can add a handling fee for your prescriptions in Atlas.md. It’s as easy as filling in a blank under your settings. Everything else is automatic. Read more about prescription handling fees here.

Shorter Patient Enrollment Form

There’s no way around it. Eventually you have to collect a lot of data about a new patient joining your clinic. Previously that information was all collected at the time the patient joined your clinic.

But some doctors worried that they were throwing just too much at a new patient. Billing info, contact info, health history, family history, medications. On and on. It’s all vital data that you need to collect, but some doctors wanted to reduce the friction at that critical moment when a patient decides to join.

Now you can enable an abbreviated enrollment form for your patients. You can collect only those absolutely necessary bits of information needed for you to contact the patient, and initiate the billing process with them. Read more about the abbreviated patient enrollment form here.

Posted by: Atlas MD

August 28, 2018

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What’s New in Atlas? Improvements to the Billing Section

DPC is such a simple concept. But still clinics find many ways to make their businesses unique. One of our most often requested category of features has to do with billing flexibility. So we’re happy to announce two of our most often requested features.

Service Fees
Though many DPC clinics operate under a subscription model, many of our users are also beginning to offer bolt-on services. Procedures and services that go above the standard subscription fee.
Though you could always make special one-off charges to patient accounts, it never quite felt built in.
This week we’re launching a new service fees section inside of your billing tab. It allows you to create these optional services and their corresponding prices.
Then when you perform the service, you can add that charge right to the patient’s invoice with a single click. Learn more about the new service charge feature here.

Enrollment Fees
Another way Atlas users are customizing their billing structure is to add an enrollment fee at the time of patient sign up. Like with Service Fees, you could always hack this with a misc. charge, but it’s better when it’s built in.

Enrollment fees have a separate billing category and have full company coverage support, so companies can decide exactly how they want to cover for their employees.

Now under Settings / Clinic Extra Charges you can specify an enrollment fee. Then when adding a new patient, adding that fee to the patient invoice is a simple checkbox during account creation. What used to be four steps is now one. Better yet, they’re broken out in billing reports so you can see just how they affect the bottom line. Read more about the new enrollment fee feature.

Posted by: Atlas MD

March 6, 2018

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New EHR Study Proves U.S. Physicians Want More Time With Patients.

Physician checking boy's heartbeatInefficiency strikes again, it seems. But not how you might think.

A new study on how much time docs spend using their EHRs released its findings last month. Medscape broke it down and you can read the whole thing here if you want.

The article says EHR time exceeds patient face time in family practice visits. The study results imply that, “US [family physicians] spend more time working in the EHR than their European counterparts spend in the entire visit.”

This could very well be true for a whole lot of reasons. But we see things from another perspective. We think physicians in America are doing what they have to do in order to provide the best care possible for their patients. They’re required to document certain things a certain way, for certain (sometimes inexplicable) reasons. Sure, they could document all the things right there in the exam room with the patient. They could spend a majority of the visit staying caught up for fear of what falling behind will do to their evening (again).

But most of them don’t.

They know they only have a few sacred minutes to serve their patient well, and they want to make the most of it. So they’ll sacrifice their evening (yes, again) just so they can look their patient in the eye. Take time they don’t have to ask some quality questions and do what med school taught them.

It’s not their fault. They’re doing their best with what they have, which is limited time and a lot of mandatory paperwork. The system is broken and docs are among the victims.

These types of articles are full of numbers, and it’s good someone’s keeping track. At the end of the day, though, the results of this study give us renewed hope that more docs will opt for Direct Care instead of letting burnout get the best of them. The heart wants what the heart wants… and it’s not paperwork.

Posted by: AtlasMD

May 5, 2017

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How Do You Spend Your Pajama Time?

Pajama time. You’ve heard of it, right? It’s the time most traditional docs spend at home catching up on paperwork from the day. You can just picture it. The rest of the house is asleep, the clock on the bedside table reads some insane hour, and even though all the doc wants to do is snooze after a long day, she’s propped up on a pillow shuffling papers around by nightlight.

DPC docs still have pajama time, but it looks a liiiiitle different. There may be PJ’s involved, but that’s about the end of the list of similarities. Instead of checking off boxes and pouring over paperwork to make sure billing codes are spun the right way and hasty patient scribbles (ahem, notes) are properly transcribed, DPC docs do something else entirely.

They build their business. They schedule Facebook or Twitter posts, write articles for their blog, outline their next marketing campaign strategy. Things that add value to their practice and spread the word about what they have to offer. Or maybe they do some extra research on a treatment plan they’re scheming for an unconventional patient. Or maybe they respond to a text message from a worried mother whose two year old has a rising fever.

We don’t know about you, but if we had to choose, DPC PJ time seems like the waaay better option. Just sayin’.

Posted by: AtlasMD

April 17, 2017

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Being a Doc Doesn’t Have to be Lonely!

The Student Doctor Thompson has some thoughts on what it means to be the “Good Doctor.” We’re paraphrasing here, but essentially, the “Good Doctor:”

Puts in the extra time to perfect the trade. They’re always available at a moment’s notice should anyone need their help. They have a good reputation because, well, their life is medicine. Most of my fellow residents look at the Good Doctor and hate his schedule but love his legacy. He works well beyond the age of retirement and has little to no life outside of medicine. The life of a doctor is a lonely one.

Thier friends have moved on… that tends to happen after you’ve neglected them through 4 year of premed, 4 years of med school and then residency. And even if they haven’t moved on, you have nothing left in common with them.

Whoa.

Heart-wrenching, right? But what really got us is what someone posted in the comments:

“The ‘Good Doctor’ sounds like he’d be a terrible husband and father.”

Or “wife and mother” if we’re being totally PC. But that one strikes a chord, doesn’t it? The notion that in order to do your job well as a physician means you gotta sacrifice literally everything else? Yeah, we docs love medicine, but we love other stuff, too. We love cars. We love public speaking. We love books, running, and movies. We love our families. And we don’t want to sacrifice any of those things. Good thing we don’t have to. 

Direct Care docs everywhere watched this video, immediately stood up and hollered at their computer screens: “IT DOESN’T HAVE TO BE THAT WAY!” Are we right? Come on, you know we’re right.

Med school is hard. Nobody’s saying otherwise. But you’re not suffering through it just to spend endless hours filling out paperwork as part of a way to leave a legacy. You’re sacrificing now so you can help people. So we encourage you to learn more about Direct Primary Care. DPC provides you a rock solid platform and business model that literally gives you the gift of time. Time with your patients, time for yourself. Before you click off the page because it sounds too good to be true, give DPC its due diligence and read up.

* Check out the DPC Curriculum: https://atlas.md/dpc-curriculum/
* Read more of this blog: https://atlas.md/blog
* Talk to docs around the country who are doing it, and love it. https://www.iamdirectcare.com

Posted by: AtlasMD

April 12, 2017

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Feature Review: Have You Tried Video Calls Yet? (Plus a Challenge.)

We’ve been dying to ask – have you tried video calls yet?? If so, fantastic! If not, we’d like to challenge you to challenge yourself to serve your patients in a new way. You might not be totally comfortable with video, and we get that, but it’s not like you’re doing Facebook Live or anything. This is just a secure conversation between you and your consenting patient that takes place over video so you can see them clearly. (Don’t rely on their panicked description of how bad that cut is. See it for yourself!)

So it’s like FaceTime, or Skype — but better! Why is it better? Because using the app’s video call feature automatically records the vitals of the call in the patient’s activity stream, showing that the conversation took place, how, when, and its duration. That’s one less thing you have to notate later; five minutes you’ve freed up to do…well, whatever you want!

This video walks you through how to initiate the call, but you can also read through the details over here in this support article.

How have video calls worked for you in your practice? Hop over to the forum and share your story! It’s a great way to get new, creative ideas on running your practice. Plus, you’ll be helping others benefit from your experience. Win-win!

Posted by: AtlasMD

September 21, 2016

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Insurance Agrees: Direct Care Is Catching On

insurancenewsnet01In an article from InsuranceNewsNet.com, Direct Care was the topic of discussion. DPC was shed in a positive light – and that’s the way it should be. Because that’s the way it is in real life. Yes, DPC and insurance are actually friends.

To those who don’t understand the business model, it might seem that Direct Care and insurance are at odds with each other. But that’s not actually the case. DPC finds its way around things that trip up the traditional healthcare system, and in a situation where the rules and regulations prevent the rules from being followed properly in the first place, a straight line from doctor to patient is a breath of fresh air. DPC never said insurance isn’t a good thing. In fact, most Direct Care providers actually recommend patients maintain a high deductible plan for emergency situations. It’s believed that filing fewer insurance claims will actually lead to more quality insurance claims… which in turn will lead to more claims that are actually paid by patients.

When patients pay for what they actually need rather than what they might need, everyone wins.

Know who else is winning? DPC providers like Tanya Spoon. She opened the doors to her Direct Care practice after a career in traditional healthcare and hasn’t looked back.

“My life/work balance is amazingly better,” she said. “I get to go home ever day for lunch.”

The benefits are familiar to those of us already immersed in the good life of Direct Care – but it’s fantastic to see them on InsuranceNewsNet.com.

“For providers, its an opportunity to spend more time practicing medicine. Spoon cared for about 4,000 people at the conventional primary care practice in Silverdale, carving out a few minutes for each visit. At Manette Clinic, she guarantees patients at least 30 minutes each time they see her, and she makes frequent house calls and visits to assisted living facilities.”

So now, it’s a quality win-win-win. Insurance companies win because they’re getting higher quality claims. Providers win because they get a work/life balance that is actually balanced. And patients win because they get a provider who has the time and energy to provide incredible care.

Posted by: AtlasMD

February 29, 2016

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Two Step Authentication

Have you been wondering how to activate or deactivate two step authentication on the Atlas.md EMR? We just launched a new video that will help you with the process, and you can read more about it in the help section or shoot us an email at hello@atlas.md if you have any questions.

While some clinics prefer to activate two step authentication, it’s all about your personal preference. What do you choose to do? Feel free to follow up in the comments or check out the forum or leave a comment below to discuss and explore with other DPC physicians.

Posted by: Atlas MD

June 12, 2015

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Are You Caught Up On the Atlas.md Podcasts?

Atlas-Blog29
Need some summer listening material? The Atlas MD docs are easy on the ears, not to mention chalk full of brain food on starting, running and maintaining a DPC clinic. In the latest podcast, Dr. Josh and Dr. Doug catch everyone up on their recent speaking engagements and upcoming events as they continue to spread the word and promote DPC around the country.

Then they give us some really sought after answers to questions everyone’s asking… just maybe not out loud. They provide a full breakdown of not only DPC billing practices, but how billing is handled within the Atlas.md EMR. In addition, the doctors address some of the struggles DPC docs experience with pharmacies – and how we can continue to improve our relationship with pharmacists everywhere.

LISTEN TO PODCAST 22 NOW!