Posted by: AtlasMD

January 24, 2018

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Growing Your Practice? You Set the Pace. Atlas Will Keep Step.

Growth: your reason, your rules, your pace.

You set out on the Direct Care journey for your reason. Maybe you wanted freedom from the limitations of a traditional healthcare environment. Maybe you were tired of having to fudge your billing codes to make a suit somewhere happy. Maybe the stack of paperwork waiting at home for you each night became too overwhelming. Maybe you wanted to live a little while also helping patients. (It’s called a social life!)

Bottom line? You’re in control. You know your patients, you know your community, you know your strengths. You know how fast or slow you want to grow your practice. If full speed ahead is your thing, that’s great; let’s make it happen. But if slow rolling growth is more your love language, that’s great, too. The beauty is that Atlas is perfectly poised to grow with you no matter how fast your strategic plan moves.

There’s nothing traditional about your practice’s growth.

This is where we say the thing nobody else will say. While growth is good, your happiness is better. Protect that happiness at all costs.

Let’s elaborate. Standard advice is to start your business and grow it as fast as you can for a better initial return on your investment, right? The marketing gurus will yell at you to GROW, GROW, GROW! The blogs will show you a million and one ways to do it.

But you don’t have to listen to them.

If you’re feeling pressured by how society says you should build your practice, take a deep breath and remember who’s in control. You. You chose this life because of the freedoms it offered, and if growing too fast too soon threatens to compromise your reasons – take a step back. Enjoy where you are right now, and slowly plan your next move. Read more

Harvard Policy Researcher Says Obamacare Will Inadvertently Break Fee-For-Service Model

In Washington, Amitabh Chandra stood before a roomful of economists, policy makers and health care experts earlier this month. As director of Health Policy Research at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government, he closed a presentation about the slowdown in health care spending over the last decade by citing an article in The New York Times.

“Changes in the way doctors and hospitals are paid — how much and by whom — have begun to curb the steady rise of health care costs in the New York region,” the article declared. “Costs are still going up faster than overall inflation, but the annual rate of increase is the lowest in 21 years.”

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