David Shaywitz Asks Healthcare Customer Service, Why Not Us?

David Shaywitz Asks Healthcare Customer Service, Why Not Us?

David Shaywitz wanted to get a flu shot for his child. So he used an app to find a location. The situation went awry and he wrote about it for Forbes. He was misdirected to a location that could not vaccinate his children, and then got the “we’ll transfer you to so-and-so” runaround at his own doctor’s office, culminating in multiple visits and “you’ve-got-to-be-kidding”-length waits.

Through his unfortunate experience he made three brilliant observations:

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Okay, So The Free Market Isn’t Exactly “Free”

First things first, The Atlantic published a Health article online recently. It’s a doozy, and after reading it, we did wonder, did it need to be this long?

However, it addresses a poignant issue: Drug companies are motivated by malleable policies that end up creating more incentive for hair regrowth drugs than ones fighting global diseases that are “Biblically”-severe i.e. malaria, Dengue fever and others.

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EPIC Fail in EHR/EMR

EPIC Fail in EHR/EMR

Here’s a quick rundown of factors contributing to EPIC’s EHR software failure.  (Previous link no longer available.)

TENS OF THOUSANDS OF FEATURES
Microsoft Word has approximately 1,200 features/functions (this is rough estimate), most of which are ignored by common users. The problem with EHR software, though, is that the market is filled with hoodwinking, one-size-fits-all “solutions” all gimmicking for doctor’s dollars. MS Word has a core base of users (the entire professional, semi-professional and college-educated world) who are familiar with core procedures and who can adapt to new features with each version. EHR/EMR software DOES NOT HAVE THIS ADVANTAGE. Asking people to sift through tens of thousands of buttons and features to “figure out” how to do something is an exercise in futility. Yet it actually happens on the marketplace.

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Fox News Columbia, South Carolina Reports On Concierge Medicine

MDVIP charges $1,500/year retainer, which comes to $125/month, a reasonable fee. However, the program operates within Medicare and traditional insurance payment. We sent out an email to find out more about what the retainer actually covers besides “all-access.” Mostly we’re curious if there are any benefits to the program that don’t entail insurance.

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Cut Costs By Keeping Patients Out of the Hospital

Cut Costs By Keeping Patients Out of the Hospital

The Atlantic posted a great article about Medicare and a private concierge medicine company providing exceptional preventative care. Give it a read.

The story covers Dr. Dougher, who works with HealthCare Partner as a primary physician in Los Angeles, California. But this is no ordinary doctor handling 1,500 patients, seeing 30-40 a day in a jam-packed office. No, Dougher sees six to eight patients per day, doing house calls for those too elderly to leave their homes.

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The EHR Marketplace Is Looking Grim

Sad news in the EHR field. A recent report from American Medical News covers a class action lawsuit filed against AllScripts Healthcare Solutions (AHS).

AHS’ product, MyWay, an EHR software program, was discontinued in late 2012. As a result, another company who provides medical supplies is also suing the company, because the licenses they acquired for $5 million are now defunct.

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Surprise! The Public Doesn’t Care About Healthcare.

That’s the conclusion that Gienna Shaw (@Gienna on Twitter) makes in her article on FierceHealthcare.com. She cites an interesting catch-22: Healthcare providers need to market their business to succeed but people don’t want to be marketed to by healthcare providers.

It’s a funny society we live in—people accept Fanta girls behaving in ludicrously sexual ways (seriously, how often do women in colorful outfits just start dancing, wait… This happens at sports games, which primarily sell food nutritionists cringe at)—or they’d rather see ginormous beer bottles and fast food hamburgers.

Kansas Direct Medicine Gets an Obamacare Bypass

There’s nothing like waking up to some seriously good news! Last Friday, the Topeka Capital Journal said the Kansas House of Representatives “eventually passed a bill” that will permit the state’s health insurance market to sell stripped-down policies.

So what’s that mean? It means Kansas residents can purchase an insurance plan covering only high-cost events like emergency, trauma and unexpected operations. This will free up the ability to pay for general care out of pocket. And it motivates doctors to stay within and join the direct care business model. Happy patients and doctors can keep up their successful relationships without the government getting in the way. And more doctors can partake in direct care’s more enjoyable professional environment.

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